Sunday, October 18, 2015

East Chester Staff Development: Keep Sharing. That's It.

If you are an educator or an instructional leader...you should read what George Couros has to say on a regular basis.  In his blog post, Why YOUR Sharing Matters, Couros states that educators can have an impact just by sharing.  By sharing, we can help others continue to grow and learn.

The East Chester Staff Development Powerpoint is available just by clicking this sentence!

East Chester Elementary Educators have been called to Keep Sharing.  We have a desire to continue to grow and learn.  We know that effectively communicating to someone else forces us to pay attention and learn more (Clive Thompson).  We are going to Keep Sharing.

The comments posted below are the ways that East Chester models reading or math, creates assessing or advancing questions, sets goals for reading or math - how we...well...

It's not the subjects that matter, it's all about teaching the child.  The comments below are from educators who make sure the learners are keeping up, who aren't afraid to change the lesson plan, who set high goals, and who love teaching the child.

We hope you find something that challenges you to continue to grow and learn. What we have to share matters.

41 comments:

  1. Setting goals is the first step in turning the invisible into the visible. Tony Robbins
    My share for the day is from Donna Boucher @MathCoachCorner. She has an excellent blog post about Using Data to Plan Effective Math Remediation. http://www.mathcoachscorner.com/2015/10/15/using-data-to-plan-effective-math-remediation/

    ReplyDelete
  2. One of the ways that I set goals for students in math class is through the pre-tests given for each standard. After the students take the pre-test, we spend time in stations talking about what they got right and what they need to work on - this is how and where we set goals for that time of study. Not every student needs all the skills in every standard. This is a simple and effective way of the students seeing their need for growth and how they can achieve that growth. My favorite blogger and TPT provider can be find here http://youngteacherlove.com/math-and-ela-student-data-tracking-binders-and-a-freebie/, Kristine Nannini is her name. She always has great products that help with the pre-testing as well as the recording of data.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so thankful Belinda shared this idea with me a few years ago. I love this concept in reading and English and the kids have really taken ownership of it. At one point I didn't know if they really grasped what was happening, but during student led conferences I heard the language they used with the parents and realized they did. I have also seen tremendous growth from this! The students realize they don't know everything and they want to reach a level 4 so badly they are more engaged during the lessons.

      Delete
  3. I have found task cards to be a great way to model what I want my students to do in reading. These task cards are short, simple and direct. I can use a few to model how they should think through questions and problems in reading. I can also model what their work should look like as they answer the task cards. SInce they are short, simple and direct, it does not take a lot of time to model, so more explicit modeling can be done in a lesson with the gradual release. Then, the task cards are placed in a center and can be used as an early finisher project or as that center activity for a few days. Task cards can be found many places. I especially like Teaching with a Mountain View's task cards on TPT. They are also easy to make. I have made a few sets myself for my class. I would be happy to help any of you by making some for you if you want.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great thought Becky! I use task cards everyday in math - especially ones with QR cards. I like these because they self check immediately and then the students can figure out what they didn't do right when they worked the problem. I like the Not So Wimpy Teacher on TPT - she has spiral review task cards. Terrific idea about modeling for reading that applies to math as well!

      OH - another share - when I make my task cards - I always print the front cover and answer key as a 4 by 6 card - that way the answers are the same size as the task cards. See you at the edge!

      Delete
    2. Do you use your task cards at the beginning of each lesson, the end, or ???
      Sherri, second grade

      Delete
    3. Sherri - I use task cards during stations each day. The students work independently with the cards and then self check or peer check using an answer key or QR codes.

      Delete
    4. Great question, Sherri! I use task cards at the beginning, middle and end! That is the great thing about task cards. They can be used in so many different ways in the classroom. I use them at the beginning to model; in the middle for them to work with buddies or independently; at the end for a quick exit ticket. They are wonderful!

      Delete
  4. I have been having my students in my reading groups ask each other a question about what we read that day. I give them a small piece of paper and have them write their question. They ask their question and discuss the answer among themselves. This is something they really enjoy and look forward to each day. Some even say they already have a question before I hand out the paper. This shows me they are thinking and questioning what they read as they are reading and listening. Sherri, second grade.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the fact that the students already have a question - that they are already thinking about what they want to ask while reading. Excellent was to use questioning! Great comment Sherri!

      Delete
    2. LOVE this! This is a tough skill and I love how you implement it in your room. It seems to really engage them, too, which is what you want!

      Delete
  5. I am 2nd year 2nd grade teacher. This year I started using leadership binders. The students have set monthly goals. These were either behavioral, physical, or social goals. We reflected monthly on their feelings toward school, and whether they achieved their goal. They also did a self assessment about their personal behavior. They checked whether they are performing the behavior, or whether they could improve, or they were not doing this behavior at all. It was wonderful to see how they knew what their weaknesses were and that they could see what they need to work on personal. Many parents, during the conference were impressed by their child's self-awareness. It was amazing to share these binders with their parents during our first parent teacher conference. I did have a few students that attended and they were excited to share their binders with their parents. We saw how they were making improvements in their reading. It also showed how one student was not being very consistent, and I was able to talk with the mother on why she felt like her student was inconsistent. I look forward to seeing how many students work improves from the beginning of the year to the end.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have seen the leadership binders in action and they are amazing!! Parents really have a more complete picture of their child's work.

      Delete
    2. Way to use the leadership binders - I think it is so important for the students to understand their own learning and growth. This is a great way to encourage independence in learning!

      Delete
    3. I am so glad to see each grade doing something with leadership binders! The next step is we all need to sit down and make them scaffold so the students don't have to relearn everything each year. I love this! Thank you for taking a HUGE step in your second year and sharing with us how you are doing that!

      Delete
  6. Belinda introduced me to interactive notebooks. Sped kids will love the manipulation of the materials and creating their own learning tools.
    Next for me: Halloween word anchor chart to use for reading, writing, and addressing the learning target of asking and answering who, what, where, why, when, and how question.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love the Halloween anchor chart idea - that will be fun and interesting for the students. http://mrswilliamsonskinders.blogspot.com/search/label/bats There are some neat charts on this!!

      Delete
    2. Ooohhh... Interactive notebooks! So much fun! I want to see your Halloween anchor chart!

      Delete
  7. One thing I do for my students is I have question stems taped down to the table. They are in charge of that specific question for that day. The questions will start out as more assessing questions and the farther down they go, the more advancing they get. When the student feels that it is an appropriate time to ask a question, they are able to. We have to ask the question as a group before we move on. Since we have been doing this, I have seen students able to come up with questions that are not on the table or change ones that are already there to better fit the story. I have seen a lot of growth from this.
    Shelby Johnson, 3rd Grade

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is great learning from a fresh new teacher. Thank you for the this great idea!!!!

      Delete
    2. What a great idea! Thanks for sharing Shelby!!

      Delete
    3. This reminds me I have GOT to tape down my questions on the table! I love this idea from you! Thank you!

      Delete
  8. This is the first year we tried Student Led Conferences. I knew my kids could do it but I did not know how well they would do it. I felt like a proud mama listening to them tell their parents all about their growth and what they were learning. The fact that they could answer questions from their parents let me know that they really understood what we had done. The written feedback from the parents was very encouraging. They enjoyed seeing a side of them that they had not seen before. Stacey 3rd

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great, Stacey! How exciting! Only two of my students showed up to conferences, but I enjoyed listening to them tell their parents about their progress. It was pretty cool. Carrie, second grade

      Delete
    2. When students can explain you know they truly understand! Great work Stacey!! Proud of your growth!!

      Delete
    3. I am so glad someone else saw what I did in my room as well. You have been a vital part of our third grade team this year! Thanks for everything!

      Delete
  9. I love to use visual cues to help language impaired students that might need an extra boost to help answer simple and/or complex questions. If there is a child that has a severe speech impairment or language impairment getting them to answer questions with conversational speech can be difficult. In order to understand those children better I suggest giving the students two choices to choose from. It helps decrease the frustration level for students and teachers. - Heather, Speech Language Pathologist

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a great idea that could be used in the regular classroom in order to modify work for students. Thank you Heather!!

      Delete
    2. I would LOVE to hear more about this, Heather! What a wonderful idea!

      Delete
  10. I am going to work on student-led questioning in my classroom. I want to teach students to ask other students questions. I am going to type some generic questions on a card and tape them to my horseshoe table to use during Read Well. The student will ask the group the question taped in front of them. I got this idea from Shelby. Thanks, Shelby!! I am also going to type some generic math questions on cards to pull out during math lessons that students can ask the class. I got this great idea from Kim! Thanks, Kim!! Carrie, second grade.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carrie - Wow. Way to take what you have read and then put it into practice. Impressive!

      Delete
    2. Carrie, you are leading others on so many levels! Thank you for being open to all of this and seeing what you can use in your classroom!

      Delete
  11. I am a second grade teacher. I want to work on question stems. I will go home tonight and google question stems. I will come in on Tuesday and copy the stems on card stock. I will adhere them to the horseshoe table and we will be ready to introduce them on Wednesday. Thank you ladies for helping to improve student led questioning!!!!!
    Dee

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dee - I found this and thought about your wonderful comment! Way to learn!! http://www.teachthought.com/learning/25-question-stems-framed-around-blooms-taxonomy/

      Delete
    2. LOVE that idea! I love your plan, too. I need to do a better job at making a plan and sticking to it like you have. I can't wait to hear how it has worked in your room!

      Delete
  12. We had another fabulous day of learning at East Chester! Belinda shared with us that what we have to say matters and shared a story about social media lurkers- that would be me- I love to follow blogs and keep up with what teachers are sharing on Instagram, but I rarely (if ever) share or comment. I think part of that is because I often feel isolated in the RTI world. I need to step out of my comfort zone and share more often. Thanks for pushing me to always be better! Mary Katras, RTI/Reading Coach

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love how you took this and applied it to your current job! Way to go Mary Allison - share things - everyone has something to share - you never know who you will influence or impact!

      Delete
    2. Mary Allison, when you "like" my things on social media, that is an encouragement - more than you realize! I want to learn from you, too, so please share what is going on in the RTI world! I want to learn from you!

      Delete
  13. I am in total agreement with George Couros's statement, "Fifty years ago, and fifty years from now, relationships will be the most important thing we do in schools." May we never lose sight that students must feeled loved and cared for when they come to school. When a child feels like their teacher knows them, loves them, and seeks the best for them, they will be motivated to work hard and reach the goals they set.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is the true meaning for schools - making a difference in the lives of children!

      Delete
    2. Yes! We love the learner - that is why we are here - to make them the best person they can be!

      Delete